Personalizing Data Security Part 3

In parts 1 and 2, we talked about various forms of security testing and evaluation by telling a story about a concerned parent purchasing (and evaluating) a car for the newly licensed teenaged daughter. Now, let's talk about the mechanic for a bit.

You, fortunately, have had a car before, and have had the opportunity to work with this mechanic before. He set your expectations, you’ve seen what he’s done before, and you generally have good reasons to trust him because you know what you want is what he is going to give you. You’ve already got a mutually established language. His services are clearly defined. You know what to expect.

What if you’ve never had a car before, and you don’t know any mechanics? 

Personalizing Data Security Part 2

Previously, we created a story that aligns data security with buying the best car for your only teenaged daughter. Now, let's explore the choice between vulnerability assessment and penetration testing - the consequences of your decision as a parent and car buyer.
Since you're tight on budget, you decide it's best to go with the thorough once-over. After all, if you opt for the test drive, you aren't going to find everything that's wrong, anyway. Your goal is to figure out how you should best spend your money now that you know your car has some flaws. Your objective is to figure out which flaws are the most serious, and address them with your wallet.

Personalizing Data Security Part 1

The problem with data security is that it isn't personal. Those who have the responsibility for security often don't have a personal stake. Sometimes, the issue is with jargon. So, let's have story time. What if your environment were a car? What if it wasn't someone else's data, but your child?

Let’s say you are a concerned parent. Your only daughter has just turned old enough to have her first car. You have shopped around for the right car to meet your needs and your budget, and you’ve bought something. But, now you need to make sure it’s safe. Not only does the law require you to meet certain requirements of auto safety, but would you feel terrible if something bad happened to your only daughter because you chose poorly? What about all of her friends who ride with her, and all the other people on the road?